The Economist
(Including Online Version)
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English version
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Subscribe to The Economist (1 year or above) to receive 1 copy of “The Economist Style Guide” 

Many people think The Economist is only about economics. It’s not. It’s about pretty much everything. From politics to business and finance, from science and technology to the arts – The Economist brings its readers clear analysis of the issues that lie behind each week’s global news stories. They satisfy the naturally curious with a distilled view of world affairs that is intelligent, insightful and thought-provoking. Whatever is happening across the globe, The Economist has an opinion on it. Which is why they tell their readers: The Economist is your essential guide to the events and issues that are shaping our world. It explores the close links between domestic and international issues, business, finance, current affairs, science and technology. Regular editorial departments include American Survey, Asia,Europe, International, Business, Finance, Science and Technology, and the Arts. In additions,The Economistalso publishes special monthly editorial surveys that focus on industries, markets or countries.


Articles inThe Economistare not signed, but they are not all the work of the editor alone. Initially, the paper was written largely in London, with reports from merchants abroad. Over the years, these gave way to stringers who sent their stories by sea or air mail, and then by telex and cable. Nowadays, in addition to a worldwide network of stringers, the paper has about 20 staff correspondents abroad. Contributors have ranged from Kim Philby, who spied for the Soviet Union, to H.H. Asquith, the paper's chief leader writer before he became Britain's prime minister, Garret FitzGerald, who became Ireland's, and Luigi Einaudi, president of Italy from 1948 to 1955. Even the most illustrious of its staff, however, write anonymously: only special reports, the longish supplements published about 20 times a year on various issues or countries, are signed. In May 2001, a redesign introduced more navigational information for readers and full colour on all editorial pages.
 

About The Economist - Style Guide 
 

The Economist - Style Guide 

Clear writing is the key to clear thinking. So think what you want to say, then say it as simply as possible.

That's the thinking that underpins this much-loved guide, and the mantra for anyone wanting to communicate with the clarity, style and precision for which The Economist is renowned.

The Economist Style Guide guides the reader through the pleasures and pitfalls of English usage. It offers advice on the consistent use of punctuation, abbreviations and capital letters, identifies common errors and cliches and contains an exhaustive range of reference material - covering everything from business ratios to mathematical symbols and common Latin phrases. It also tackles the key differences between British and American English.

But this is no ordinary guide to English usage. It has a wit, verve and flair which make it much more than a simple work of reference. Here are just some examples:

- anticipate does not mean expect. Jack and Jill expected to marry; if they anticipated marriage, only Jill might find herself expectant. - Take care with between. To fall between two stools, however painful, is grammatically acceptable. To fall between the cracks is to challenge the laws of physics. - critique is a noun. If you want a verb, try criticise. - use words with care. If this door is alarmed, does its hair stand on end?

The Economist Style Guide is required reading for anyone who wants to communicate with style.
 
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